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Barrie-Orillia Ontario Nearby Towns and Attractions: Bruce Penninsula



Link to Bruce Trail

The Bruce Peninsula lies between Georgian Bay on the east and the main basin of Lake Huron to the west. It is formed by the part of the Niagara Escarpment that extends north into the lake from southern Ontario toward Manitoulin Island, which is the northernmost portion of the Escarpment.

The Bruce Peninsula is part of Bruce County,and includes a number of tourist destination towns including Tobermory and Wiarton. The area is home to the Bruce Peninsula National Park, Fathom Five National Marine Park and the part of the Bruce Trail.

The Bruce Peninsula offers camping, hiking, fishing and nature in two national parks, .The Bruce Peninsula National Park and the Fathom Five National Marine Park, a half dozen nature reserves and regional parks. The Niagara Escarpment and the Bruce Trail makes this area very attractive to naturalists.

Official Site for Bruce County.

FoundLocally's Business listings for Wiarton

FoundLocally's Business listings for Tobermory

Bruce Peninsul Attractions

Bruce County Museum
Southampton, Ontario.
(519)797-2080.
Bruce County Museum is rich with heritage. From marine history to pioneer settlers, first nations, military and archival information the museum is a must stop on your travels. The Museum has a wide range of events and cultural activities including exhibits, films, meetings, art shows, musical events and business gatherings.

Cabot Head Lighthouse
Turn east off Highway 6 on the Dyers Bay Road. through community of Dyer's Bay and along the shore road to Cabot Head
519-795-7780.
Friends of Cabot Head
Box 233 Lions Head, ON, N0H 1W0
This century-old lighthouse sits on the eastern edge of the Bruce Peninsula with breathtaking, panoramic view of white limestone cliffs and blue-green Georgian Bay water. From the tower, you can see Flowerpot Island, Lonely Island, Bear's Rump Island and Cape Croker.

The Lindsay Township Heritage Room is furnished with artifacts from the mid-to- late 1800's. The Marine Room features nautical history from the first commercial fishing to trade and shipwrecks and the Environmental Room to learn about the area's geological features and fauna. Take a Historical Self-Guided Walking Tour utilizes a site map brochure and strategically placed interpretive historical plaques throughout the light station site.The lighthouse is open from sunrise to sunset, 7 days a week from Victoria Day weekend to Thanksgiving. Admission by donation.

Chi-Cheemaun Owen Sound Transportation Company, Owen Sound, Ontario
(519) 376-6601
Tobermory Terminal (519) 596-2510
South Baymouth Terminal (705) 859-3161
Reservations: 1-800-265-3163
The M.S. Chi-Cheemaun ("The Big Canoe") ferry connects South Baymouth on Manitoulin Island and the north shore of Lake Huron with Tobermory on the Bruce Penninsula and the rest of Southern Ontario. Trips take about 2 hours and operates from mid-May until mid-October. In the 1930's when a small, wooden vessel, the Kagawong, first ferried automobiles across the waters of Georgian Bay, roughly following the present-day route.

The $12 million Chi-Cheemaun is operated by Ontario Northland (owned by the Ontario government). It features drive-on, drive-off bow and stern loading and unloading through a visored bow system and a square door stern section. The ship is 365 feet long with a 62 foot beam and has capacity for 638 passengers and 113 vehicles, including room for 17 highway vehicles such as buses and transport trucks. The ship is powered by two Ruston 3500 horse power diesel engines and an 800 horse power "bow thruster" engine which improves the handling of the vessel at slow speeds.

Flowerpot Island Lighthouse
The original lighthouse on Castle Bluff on Flowerpot Island, built of hand-hewn timbers, stood so high its rays could be seen from its tall imperial lighthouse relatives along the shoreline.

The lighthouse was built in 1897, on the north-easterly point of the island, during the heyday of the Great Lakes shipping industry. In 1901, a two-storey lightkeeper's dwelling was built, and supplemented by a one-storey 1959 dwelling closer to the lighthouse for the assistant lightkeeper. In 1909, a fog building and fog alarm were constructed at the cliff site, replacing bells and hand-horns. Today's observation deck is the site of the original fog building. In 1969, the lighthouse building was pushed from the cliff and replaced with a steel tower, still in use today. In 1995, Friends of Fathom Five and the Canadian Coast Guard bean lightouse restoration, and the century-old lightkeeper's house is open for tours, cold drinks and souvenirs. The Flowerpot Lightstation is accessible only by boat from mainland Tobermory, with tour boats leaving from Little Tub Harbour (plus a Parks Canada users fee)

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